INCMA Forum Posts Archive 1:
 
Date: 07/6/00 08:47:54 AM
Name: Curiousg63

Email:

Subject: Re: Re: Heavy bag drills?

Article:
uhhhhh....sorry -didn't mean to make my post anonymus...
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Replying to Original Article:

Article:
I'm not sure if you mean heavy bag and bob or just bob? If you mean heavy bag seperate I know what i like. (I don't know if it is sound as far as injuries go though...) I like to start of with basic punches as fast as possible, as the bag swings out, I close distance until the bag is staying at a 45degree angle by rapid punches, I then lower into a horse stance and stay there as long as I can without comprimising my wrists. It seems to strengthen my wrists, increase punch power, punch stamina, punch speed, stance strength, and stance balance. I go in 3 minute "rounds", so if I can't keep this up for the duration, I change into other techniques. I like kick combinations that move bags. For instance, I will forward leg snap kick the bag and then step into it with a rear leg front kick and then switch feet back and do a side kick. As long as you ar careful and don't jam your knee (like I did a while back), it is good for combination kicks, power, balance, and speedd. It is also useful in training for attackers- like the aproach and weight of the bag (kicks aren't good if the aproaching person knocks you down instead). As the bag slows movements, I like to use some hand combinations for a transition into other kicks or repetetive drills. I like practicing blocks in hard rapid succesion like the punch and kick drills. It seems to increase timing, strength, and speed of blocks by creating that same swing of the bag, after creating an angle with the bag by blows, simply continue the same hand blocks to kep it there as long as possible. Just some ideas, might want to check with an athletic trainer first to make sure it isn't harmful(doesn't seem to be to me though).



Date: 07/7/00 12:46:33 AM
Name: Sovann

Email: pens@juno.com

Subject: Re: Heavy bag drills?

Article:
Kevin: It is nice to have the anatomical targets to work with and not just on the head, I like to target solar plexus and floating ribs for horizonal elbows - grazing and thrusting strikes. The other day I was working on thrusting strikes with my bo. I work on all my strikes from Finger Set. It's nice for palm strikes, handsword, etc. My daughter (3 yrs) is partial to the finger poke and #1 with sticks on BOB.

John: Thank you for your suggestion. We sometimes extend the arm fully to work on the pivot of the foot-knee-hip-shoulder from a horse stance into our hard bow (foward leaning) stance to practice generating the energy you describe.

Curious: thanks for the kick combinations. I'll try that.

Vicki: Try planting your base foot closer to the bag as you kick if you want to move it - you'll give it more of a push. If you direct that snap energy John described the bag will fold instead of move. The push energy is what'll move the bag on it's hinge.
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Replying to Original Article:

Anybody have some good heavy bag and solo training drills to share? I'm trying to keep in shape, working out on my own.

What I do now to warm up (on my BOB heavy bag - you know, Chuck Norris' friend from Century) is:
-hit him with my sticks (laptic, witik and abanico strikes)
-40 jabs on both sides (set of 10 then switch sides)
-40 front kicks
-40 shuffle roundhouse off front leg

then
-20 jab-cross on both sides
-20 bkfist-cross
-20 jab-cross high hook
-20 jab-cross-low hook-high hook
-20 jab-cross-rear roundhouse kick
-20 jab-cross-rear roundhouse kick-high hook
-20 lead knee
-20 rear knee
-20 skip knee
-20 horizonal elbow
-20 horizontal elbow-vertical elbow
-20 double knees w/headbutts
-20 palm heels w/headbutts

and finish off with as many hard roundhouses as I can do off both sides.

Any other combos or drills to suggest?
Thanks, Sovann



Date: 07/12/00 09:04:30 PM
Name: Mark McGee

Email: mmcgee@gmaf.og

Subject: Re: Heavy bag drills?

Article:
You have a pretty good list. One drill is to select three strikes and three kicks to work on each practice. Run through each one with 20 - 40 movements (i.e. 20 right hand punches, 20 left hand punches, 20 right hand knife strikes, 20 left hand knife strikes, 20 right reverse elbows, 20 left hand reverse elbows, 20 right front kicks, 20 left front kicks, 20 right round house kicks, 20 left round house kicks, 20 right side kicks, 20 left side kicks). Next, start combining them until you've done everything you can think of doing (i.e. 20 left-right punch combinations with right roundhouse kick). Change the three hand and foot movements each practice. This will take you many practices to work through all the possible combinations. You'll also get a great workout.

Kung Fu Internal stylists can use the heavy bag to develop precision and accuracy of concealed movements within the form.

Hope this helps. Have a great week!

Mark McGee
Grace Martial Arts Fellowship
www.gmaf.org 



Date: 07/6/00 08:51:09 AM
Name: Curiousg63

Email:

Subject: Re: Re: Philosophy

Article:
sorry to break the flow for a second, but I thought that was interesting Viki, I'm from OKlahoma and am part Choctaw as well as a Heinz 57 mix of Euro backgrounds. Just thought I'd say "hi" to another native!
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Replying to Original Article:

Article:
Our school never had any reading requirements, except at yellow belt to memorize John 3:16, and then at red belt, right before our test, we had to read in John about Jesus with his disciples, and washing their feet. But other than those two, we never had to read anything else.
I do feel that if you are studying the martial arts, if you are interested in the background, studying information about the culture, is great. The reason is because you see why it was developed, like the history, and also, how they live in their countries.
It's kinda like tracing back your family routes. My family consists on my biological dad's side, Cherokee Indian. His great great grandfather was a chief in Oklahoma back in the 1800's. On my step dad's side of the family, which I consider him my dad his mother is English, from England, and his father is Jewish German. My mom's side of the family is all Scottish, Irish, English, and German. The reason why I listed this, is because our backgrounds are all different, but together form who I am.
With training of the martial arts, and reading about their customs and cultures, it makes you understand why certain things are done. For a prime example: Bowing!
In the Asian cultures bowing is a significance of respect and curtosy. When you meet someone for the first time, here in America, we shake hands. However, in Japan, and other Asian countries they do a bow. That is why they bow in the martial arts, not because of bowing in religion.
I think understanding where they come from, and what they been through will help you appreciate the martial arts much more.
I however will not back out of my Christian beliefs, though, and do things against my personal beliefs.

I hope this helps,
Vicki

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Replying to Original Article:

Hi! I was just wondering how many of your schools require reading assignments (philosophy). In my school, we are required at each level to read a section of philosophy that somehow relates to martial arts. Most of it is Eastern, but not all. We are encouraged to "read between the lines" and find meaning that could relate to our everyday lives.Doing this, I (and im sure i speak for others in my school) have learned alot about Asian culture and in turn, martial arts and life...So what about your schools? What do you have to read? Do you think this benefits the student?
Til Next Time, Train Hard
Cortney



Date: 07/6/00 09:01:35 AM
Name: Curiousg63

Email:

Subject: Re: Philosophy

Article:
My school is not a "Christian" school so to speak, but my instructor is a believer. ALthough our readings are not religious, they are very benificial to keeping the history and linage of what we do alive. He will occassionally bring excerpts from books about Karate-Do and Karate greats from the past. He also loaned my his prized book "The History and Philosophy of Karate-Do" by Nakaya. The reason it is so prized by him, is that it was of the first books off the press and is autographed by Nakaya- which happened to be his instuctor. For anyone interested in this subject, or simply Christianity and the martial arts, I would sudgest this book. Being of Eastern background, he has a heart for the heritage of Karate. But the interesting thing is, he is a christian. He begins his book by dedicating it to Christ, and on a regular basis, he makes christian commentary in his book about his faith. It is quite interesting. Aside from the christian aspect,, it is simply a good book with well researched information. Study of your art's background would be very benificial to your growth as a martial artist, but I do acknowledge ultimate growth comes from the Word.
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Replying to Original Article:

Hi! I was just wondering how many of your schools require reading assignments (philosophy). In my school, we are required at each level to read a section of philosophy that somehow relates to martial arts. Most of it is Eastern, but not all. We are encouraged to "read between the lines" and find meaning that could relate to our everyday lives.Doing this, I (and im sure i speak for others in my school) have learned alot about Asian culture and in turn, martial arts and life...So what about your schools? What do you have to read? Do you think this benefits the student?
Til Next Time, Train Hard
Cortney



Date: 07/12/00 09:10:44 PM
Name: Mark McGee

Email: mmcgee@gmaf.og

Subject: Re: Philosophy
 
Article:
Philosophy is important since martial arts is more mental than physical. As Christians, our philosophy about anything is directed by the Holy Spirit Who lives within our hearts and minds. Christianity began as a Middle Eastern spiritual philosophy but with a Heavenly perspective that no other philosophy could possibly have. It's the Truth and will set the believer free.

Christian instructors who are schooled in both the ways of Christ and the ways of Budo can help their students see the truth from both perspectives. We have no need to be afraid of philosophies different than ours. The Apostle Paul was well read and often quoted from Greek and Roman philosophy when preaching the Gospel of Christ. He wasn't afraid because he knew the Truth.

Hope this helps.

Mark McGee
Grace Martial Arts Fellowship
www.gmaf.org 



Date: 07/6/00 11:07:58 AM
Name: KenpoKev

Email: kevin@annuity1.com

Subject: Re: Christian Martial Arts

Article:
Hi Vicki,
I've run into that sort of attitude for years. I have found it is based primarily on ignorance, both of martial arts and the Holy Scriptures. Unfortunately, you will run across many people who will pick and choose scriptures to manipulate and influence others for their own agenda. That is why we are challenged to have a discerning spirit, especially when dealing with those who preach and teach.

The history of the "Martial Arts is an Instrument of Satan" comes from a couple papers written in the early 70's by a seminary student which were published in a few chirstian journals. The author cited a number of Asian instructor's comments concerning their spiritual positions, then promptly rolled all martial arts together and claimed it to be of the occult. That's it, end of story, if you disagree, you must be less spiritual, and all that rot.

While one must be cautious in selecting an instructor, I submit that there are far more insideous elements facing us every day, newspapers, tv, "news", music, and our teachers, whether they be in karate class, the local college or your Sunday school class. We must remain cautious in what we accept as "truth". Test it on Scripture.
in His grip (sometimes by a thread),
Kevin
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Replying to Original Article:

Article:
Chuck Norris, almost sixty? WOW!  I am glad to see that we are being put into an article, about the martial arts. I was surfing the 'net the other day and came across a disturbing website, that said that Christians in the martial arts is absolutely 100% wrong, no ifs and or buts about it. However, I sent him an email stating how it isn't wrong, that you have to know where you stand with God first. I told him to check out the modern technology of the 'net and to search for "Christian Martial Arts" and he would find a lot of organizations, and training areas that are Christian related. So far, not yet a responce.

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Replying to Original Article:

Hey Gang,
A nice article is in the current New Man magazine (Promisekeepers) about martial arts ministries and a piece on Chuck Norris (can you believe he's 60 yrs old!!!).

It's nice to get some good press for a change!
Regards,
Kevin Schaller
Kirisuto Kyo Bushido



 Date: 07/6/00 09:38:01 PM
Name: Vicki (blackrat78)

Email: blackrat78@hotmail.com

Subject: Cross Training?

Has anyone ever acheived rank in one style and then change to a new style? Did you ever forget what you ever learned in the old style, did you remember only the key things, or did you remember everything? I started my martial arts, major training in Pasaryu Taekwondo in November of 1995, and earned my black belt in November of 1998. I left my old school in December of 1998, but made sure to look back at my demo tape, and my black belt tape, to review on my technique, while I was out of the martial arts. I remember most of my forms, and my kicks and punches, and such, but my sets of self-defense are rusy. Even watching the tape, I sometimes forget exactly where they attacked from, or what I was doing, when the tape caught me on a bad side. I now study martial arts in the Kyokunshinkai system, and have been able to keep my black belt on, because the instructor respects that I have some experience already, and will be testing for an orange belt soon. Even though so far, the first six katas I have learned already are not yet like the others I have learned, I realized that when the instructor lined us all up, and sat us down, and then he called on his purple belt, and green belt to demonstrate some forms, I noticed they are pronouced slightly different, and done slightly different. I am trying not to ever forget 100% of what I already know, but I know that when I get to those forms "katas as they say" I'll have to try my best not to mix them. So far I have seen that their are seven simular to what I learned in Pasaryu Taekwondo.

Basically, what I am asking is how do you remember what you already know, and not forget it, but to put it to the side, to relearn the new stuff. Some basic strikes and kicks are even done differently, and I have adapted to them quite well, but forms were always my hardest thing to relearn. I am not yet sure if I am able to bring a video camera into this dojo and tape what I should know. I do know this place so far has helped me with some things that were kinda "unsure" of in my old style, become sure.

Thanks,

Vicki 



Date: 07/7/00 01:05:22 AM
Name: Sovann

Email: pens@juno.com

Subject: Re: Cross Training?
 
Article:
Hi Vicki,

I've studied a few arts officially and I'm always reading and meeting folks from other arts. It hasn't really been that hard for me to keep the two or three main arts seperate because they are different enough to complement each other. Kenpo the way I learned it emphasized techniques by the numbers and katas. The stickfighting style I took was Baston-te, a substyle of Arnis. It was WAY more principle oriented, and emphasized combat-effectiveness. In my Kenpo training it was with gi, in dojo, traditional. The Baston-te was literally in my instructors garage, we trained in street clothes or sweats and shoes.

Think the conflicts can come up when one style points your foot at a 45 degree angle for your forward leaning stance and the other points it a 90 degree. You develop so much muscle memory in your stances and where you chamber your fist that it's hard to unlearn and relearn it another way. Baston-te didn't place the emphasis on stances and looking "just so".

For instance, when you do an upperward block does your blocking hand travel on the outside or inside of your opposite hand? I've learn both.

My philosophy is it's all good. Cross-training is fun and a great way to meet fellow martial artists. Certain flavors of MA (SE Asian/Kenpo/Boxing/Wrestling) agree with my body-type, temperament, level of agility and background, but I enjoy learning and watching and appreciating ALL arts.

For instance, I just watched some tapes of Russian MAist Vladmir Vasiliev. It mostly befuddled me - for parts I thought "This guy's smooth, good flow, good concepts.", other times I thought "No way, that's crazy. Is he for real?". It was very soft-style, like tai chi or long fist. It worked great for him, but with my body type and even that of his students on the tape it does not flow so well.

Ooops, little bit of a digression there.
Back to different styles, just enjoy and respect your current instructor and try to uphold and honor what you've learned. Some of my friends who have trained in other styles or go on to other styles feel they need to completely turn their back on their old styles. For two reasons, 1) some people just can't concentrate and learn the new style with extra mental baggage of old style. 2) emotional baggage or falling out with old instructor or broken expectation with the old style and they "click" with the new style/instructor.

Vicki, I forgot to ask - is your new instructor a Christian?

Take care, Sovann 



Date: 07/7/00 09:50:45 AM
Name: Vicki (blackrat78)

Email: blackrat78@hotmail.com

Subject: Re: Re: Cross Training?

Article:
Sovann,
Yes, my new instructor is a Christian, but we do not use the Christians aspects in class. He doesn't want to lose the traditional manner, so we do the bowing, which never bothered me in the first place. However we do not do any mediation, or anything that makes me feel uncomfortable with my Christian beliefs. Our new location is taught in a town or two south of where I live, in a local church. One of the other black belts who took up takewondo has been having a lot of problems, and our new instructor "sensei" has asked us numerous of times to keep him in prayers. He has even asked us to keep himself in prayer too, because of all he has been going though.
About the style, they are not totally opposite like that of karate to kung fu, or taekwondo to kempo, but they are simular, but some of the strikes make more sense. The forms are very simular once we get into my old version of the "pyungahn" forms. I just don't want to end up mixing them up.
Thanks,
Vicki  



Date: 07/12/00 08:47:44 PM
Name: Mark McGee

Email: mmcgee@gmaf.og

Subject: Re: Cross Training?

Article:
I've studied many styles through the years. Each new experience has meant putting aside my previous style for a time. I suggest you "mark" your previous forms, one-steps, self defense, weapons, etc. so you don't forget. Go through them once a week to make sure you remember. You can also video tape each one so you can return to the movements if you forget later. Once you are solid in your new style, you can return to more practice of previous styles. As you progress, you can fold the best of what you've learned into your practice.

Have a great week!

Mark McGee
Grace Martial Arts Fellowship
www.gmaf.org 



Date: 07/8/00 10:38:21 PM
Name: Curiousg63

Email:

Subject: Zimik Cosmo

Ayone here got to work with Bro. Cosmo before? He is coming to my church for a visit and am just wondering. I am very excited. 



Date: 07/9/00 09:57:32 PM
Name: Sovann

Email: pens@juno.com

Subject: Re: Zimik Cosmo

Article:
Yes, I met Cosmo in Feb. He accompanied our club's demo team down to AZ for Spring Break. I was unable to go since my son was born the week before, so we were very thankful that the Lord provided him to go with the team to provide leadership. It is amazing to see what God has done in his life. Learn as much as you can from him . Tell him Sovann said "hi" and that he is in our prayers. Maybe you could ask him to write an article hear about his testimony and his ministry all around the world. 



Date: 07/11/00 10:55:51 PM
Name: Vicki (blackrat78)

Email: blackrat78@hotmail.com

Subject: Black Belt

Do any of you who promote students to black belt have any special markings or writings on the black belts you issue? Do you as an instructor have any special markings or writings on your black belt?
If so, what do you put on your black belts? Do you write in the writing language of the country your style originated from, or do you use English?
Do you put a verse on there, images, or just the person's name and maybe a bar to represent first degree?
My original system, Pasaryu my instructor Mr. Blackstone had a big long red stripe on the right side of his belt to represent a fifth degree black belt, but when he was promoted to a sixth degree black belt, he had a new belt. He had a 2 inch wide black belt, with six bars on one side, and the Christian fish image with the letters in it, and then on the other side of his belt was his name. The markings and writings were all in a goldish color, and looked really nice.
When we were promoted to black belt under Mr. Blackstone we didnt' get any special markings on our belt, inless we went to a place and had it done.
In the system I take now, Kyokunshinkai Karate, when we acheive a black belt under that instructor they have your first and last name on one side of the belt, and a stripe on each side of the belt, to represent your degree. Also, the Japanese letters for Kyokunshinkai Karate are on the belt and that too looks nice.
I am looking foward to that belt soon, hopefully.
Well, what do you guys do? I am curious, and interested, as always about other martial arts schools.
Thanks,
Vicki 



Date: 07/12/00 01:45:36 PM
Name: Stephen Lawwell

Email: slawwell@comdata.com

Subject: Re: Black Belt

Article:
I give my students two different black belts. A plain one for training and an embroidered one for special ceremonies and display. The embroidered one has their name on one tip and the name of our school on the other tip. A cross is below the name of our school. I have never been real thrilled about the fish symbol. I much prefer the cross. That is what it is all about.

As far as my belt goes, I wear a simple, plain belt. It does not in any way show my three degrees. Alot of instructors have become very vain in the wearing of an instructor's rank. If you are the instructor you need to be and earn the respect of your students there is no need to separate yourself from them by wearing elaborate belts.

Your Brother In Christ,
Stephen Lawwell
Kicks For Christ School Of Martial Arts 



Date: 07/12/00 06:47:50 PM
Name: Vicki (blackrat78)

Email: blackrat78@hotmail.com

Subject: Re: Re: Black Belt

Article:
Do you have a picture or something to show how the cross is put on there, because I have a hard time visualizing how a belt looks w/ a cross, when it is small in width. I do like seeing the gold stripes to represent rank, because for kids especially, or younger people, with black belt you no longer stripe test, so this is a good way for those to see their rank.
The fish image has so many meanings though, that make it special, just as like the cross.
The fish image with the letters have meanings of Christ, Son, Savior, and two others, I can't recall off hand. The fish also can represent when Jesus said to his disciples, Come and follow me, and I will make you fishers of men. So that's another thing I like about it. 



Date: 07/12/00 08:41:12 PM
Name: Mark McGee

Email: mmcgee@gmaf.og

Subject: Re: Black Belt

Article:
Interesting question. Two of my master instructors wear a simple black gi and black belt with no stripes. One is an 8th Dan. The other is a 7th Dan. I am inspired by their humbleness about their knoweldge, skill and rank. I have followed their example and wear a dark gi with black belt with no stripes. We wear simple dark clothing when demonstrating Kung Fu and T'ai Chi and a dark gi when demonstrating Karate.

We have discussed the possibility of wearing a Christian patch of some kind, but that's still in the thought process. I appreciate hearing what others are doing.

Have a great week!

Mark McGee
Grace Martial Arts Fellowship
www.gmaf.org



Date: 07/12/00 04:51:45 PM
Name: David Lieder

Email: dlieder@rmi.net

Subject: Demonstration & worn out
 
We did our demonstration July 4th all day outside (90+ degrees). 2 adults, 4 teens and 2 youth. We broke 90 boards, 27 bricks and 1 pinky finger knuckle. We were all exhausted. Performed along side a christian band and was able to also share our faith some. I still haven't gotten rested back up. We keep getting more new students just about every day. The Lord is really pouring out his blessings on us and our school. Finances are no longer a problem now; what a relief that is. One of my pastors has started taking lessons from us and he is excited about helping me develope our message and ways of delivering it.

Right now I'm really tired because my regular full time steel fabricating bussiness is very low on work and I am having to give extra time to get work in without losing money. Then I teach classes every night also. I'm trying also to devote quiet time with my wife. Please pray for me that I will soon get some rest.

Thanks,
David 



Date: 07/12/00 06:51:30 PM
Name: Vicki (blackrat78)

Email: blackrat78@hotmail.com

Subject: Re: Demonstration & worn out

Article:
Great, glad to hear it was a success. I miss doing demos, even though I only did one of them.  I just loved being able to show others what I was able to do, however our demo didn't preach any message. A black belt student, when I was a red belt, was in charge of the event as the new instructor worked. He didn't even come to the school, to support us. Oh well, we won't get into that again, will we?
I just hope all goes well with your karate school, and that God will bless it more and more. :0) 



Date: 07/12/00 09:18:39 PM
Name: Mark McGee

Email: mmcgee@gmaf.og

Subject: Re: Demo Help

Article:
I am reading your question after July 4th, but maybe this will help for future demos. The Holy Spirit is your best guide in all matters. Other Christians can share how the Spirit led them, but only you know how the Spirit is guiding you. Stay close to God and His Word and He will lead you in what to do. His Grace will show you the way.

Some public demos work well to share the Gospel in an open and direct fashion. Others don't. However, every demo gives you the opportunity to share with people one on one. That's where many great things happen spiritually. Private demos in churches, church camps, your school, etc. are wonderful for indepth explanations about God's Love for sinners.

I hope this helps.

Mark McGee
Grace Martial Arts Fellowship
www.gmaf.org
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Replying to Original Article:

I have a small TKD school in Texas. I have been asked to perform one or more demonstrations for our towns 4th of July extravaganza. I am trying to use our school as a witnessing tool. We don't preach but we play Christian contemporary music, have the fish displayed on flyers and openly talk about church and what we believe. I want to use the demo for Christ. The extravaganza is a public event so I can't just go out and evangilize. I am thinking along the line of what the PowerTeam does in public schools. I am looking to all of you for help, suggestions and prayers on what to perform and say.

Thanks,
David



Date: 07/12/00 09:21:51 PM
Name: Mark McGee

Email: mmcgee@gmaf.og

Subject: Re: Where to teach?

Article:
I teach at a YMCA. It allows me a wonderful opportunity to meet people of many backgrounds and interests. I do share Christian philosophy with my classes. Some students don't like that and don't continue studying with me. Others either enjoy it or wait for me to finish.

God will guide you into the best way for you to teach. He is creative that way!

Mark McGee
Grace Martial Arts Fellowship
www.gmaf.org
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Replying to Original Article:

Just a question to all the teachers, where do you teach, or the students, where do you learn? Do you learn at a local church, a YMCA, YWCA, some building, or do you have a location of our own?
I don't knwo why I am asking, but I was curious.
I think I am curious, because some chruches, you either have to belong to that church, or most in that church are exactly that denomation, when they do the martial arts. The YMCA or YWCA's usually have a higher fee for non YMCA or YWCA members. A location of your own is always nice too, but it can be expensive.
I don't know, again, just am wondering.



Date: 07/12/00 09:24:41 PM
Name: Mark McGee

Email: mmcgee@gmaf.og

Subject: Re: Judo

Article:
Greetings! I started my martial arts study in 1961 with Judo. It is part of our curriculum in Yon Ch'uan Martial Arts. I don't find many Judokas these days, especially in Christian martial arts. Nice to hear from you!

Mark McGee
Grace Martial Arts Fellowship
www.gmaf.org
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Replying to Original Article:

Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ;

Just wanted to write to see if there is anyone interested in learning more about the martial art of judo. My wife and I are judo instructors and have noticed that the majority of the martial artists in the INCMA are not judo. We would love to visit and correspond with any Christian martial artist that is of the same mind regardless of their style.

In His Service,

Allen and Karen Sapp



Date: 08/19/00 06:51:06 AM
Name: Richard Roper

Email: Richard_Roper@bigpond.com

Subject: Re: Re: Judo

Article:
G'day,

I just recently joined this forum. I started Judo in 1964 and have done very little other Martial Arts all my life. I am now an instructor in 2 clubs, one in a not so close YMCA and the other in my home church. I would be happy to correspond with you about Judo.

Yours in Jesus

Richard  



Date: 07/12/00 09:28:23 PM
Name: Mark McGee

Email: mmcgee@gmaf.og

Subject: Re: Belt test costs

Article:
I absolutely agree with you! It is not traditional to charge for belts and it sends the wrong message. We instructors should give the testing belts as gifts/rewards to our students or help them dye their lower ranking belts as they grow. Two of my black belts started as white belts. I dyed them as I progressed in rank. It has a special meaning to me to wear a black belt that used to be my white belt. It sends the right message to me continually. I will always be a white belt, ever learning.

Mark McGee
Grace Martial Arts Fellowship
www.gmaf.org
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Replying to Original Article:

I have noticed many members of the forum have discussed how they charge $10, $15, or possibly as high as $50 for a belt test. My question is "Why charge at all?" I'm sure many will say, "To cover the cost." Non-black belts cost about $2.00 each from Century or AWMA and black belts cost about $4.00. Embroidery work can be done for around $10. Certificates (professionally printed) only cost about 10 cents each. For something this inexpensive, is it not possible for the instructor to pick up this cost? If not, is it not possible to use a little bit of the money that is raised from the class offerings? I come from the school of thought that the student has already paid for the belt test through their training and hard work. Sometimes I think we forget as instructors that a rank is a gift which is given by the teacher as a reward for the student's hard work. God was willing to give us a Gift to show His love towards us. I think the least we could do is try and reflect that love in the way we do our promotions.

Your Brother In Christ,
Stephen Lawwell
Kicks For Christ School Of Martial Arts



Date: 07/12/00 09:35:57 PM
Name: Mark McGee

Email: mmcgee@gmaf.og

Subject: Soke Karl Marx Clinics

Soke Karl Marx asked me to share an offer with other Christian martial artists. Dr. Marx is founder of Keichu-Do Karate. He is a 10th Dan of amazing knowledge and skill. Dr. Marx is also a deeply committed Christian. Soke Marx is willing to hold clinics "without charge" for Christian schools. The only cost would be for airplane fare and lodging for him and an assistant. This is a rare and unique opportunity. You can contact Dr. Marx at
keichu-do-1@juno.com.

Mark McGee
Grace Martial Arts Fellowship
www.gmaf.org 



Date: 07/18/00 03:05:59 PM
Name: Stephen Lawwell

Email: slawwell@comdata.com

Subject: Fundraiser ideas

Just curious if anyone has any good ideas for a fund raiser. We are trying to raise $83,000 for the construction of a home for unwed, pregneant teens (alternative to abortion). The project is currently half-way funded. We have exhausted every fundraiser idea that I could think of, the most successful being a Kick-A-Thon that raised $7,500. Anybody got any ideas?

Your Brother In Christ,
Stephen Lawwell
Kicks For Christ School Of Martial Arts 



Date: 07/18/00 04:06:03 PM
Name: Vicki (blackrat78)

Email: blackrat78@hotmail.com

Subject: Re: Fundraiser ideas

Article:
What ideas have you already done?
Here are some of my ideas, hope you don't think any of them are stupid.
Board breaking, like the kick a thon. Have the students break boards, using rebreakable ones, to save on costs, for how many times they can break it, with differen strikes being worth certain amounts of money. Or you just could say a certain amount for any break.
Food Sales like the parents of the kids, and such, cook up some bakery goods, and sell them, at a local Walmart or somewhere like that. Just if you do it at a Walmart, make sure you ask permission of the manager, becuase that's how we do it at our Walmart.
Rummage Sales, get everyone in the school to gather up some old stuff, clothes, etc, and then have a huge sale, all proceeds going to the cause. Make sure they know what the sell will go for that. Also, other members may acutally like to get something anotehr member is buying.
Have a demo team gather and perform a demo, like a get ready for school demo, and have them perform, and charge an admission, and have some work up some consessions, to have food, too, with all proceeds going to the cause.
I hope some of them work, trust me 



Date: 07/18/00 04:30:34 PM
Name: Wes and Terrie

Email:

Subject: Re: Fundraiser ideas

Article:
10K Runs are very profitable here in Texas and you could combine the run with a spaghetti dinner the night before. I run as part of my martial art workout, so this might compliment the athletic image of your school. Also, amongst kids, "friday night lock-ins" are popular. Charge kids $10 to play games, watch movies and spend the night at your dojo or church. Good luck! 



Date: 07/19/00 08:55:04 AM
Name: Stephen Lawwell

Email: slawwell@comdata.com

Subject: Re: Re: Fundraiser ideas

Article:
Those are all great ideas! On the 10K runs is this something that the students run and get sponsorships for or is it something you open to the public and charge an entry fee?

Thanks,
Stephen 



 Date: 07/19/00 10:42:54 AM
Name: Stephen Lawwell

Email: slawwell@comdata.com

Subject: Re: Re: Fundraiser ideas

Article:
The board breaking with re-breakable boards sounds interesting. I might look into getting some of those and see how good they work. We usually break 2 inch pation blocks in our demos but they are too expensive to use in a fundraiser (about $1.25 each).
The bakery sale is a good idea but the ladies in the church already have held about 4 different ones at the local Wal-Mart.
The demo route worked real well for us too. We held demos on the three different occasions and was able to raise several thousand dollars, the only problem is that almost everybody in the county has seen us at least once. It's hard to get people to come out again for pretty much the same thing.

Thanks,
Stephen 



Date: 07/19/00 12:44:01 PM
Name: Curiousg63

Email:

Subject: Re: Re: Re: Fundraiser ideas

Article:
ONe thing you may look at is approaching churches about demos, you can do it for youth or the whole congregation. Do the demo, with whatever christian emphasis you feel led, and make sure to share specifics about why and what you are raising funds for. Churches sometimes like something fresh and can respond well in the name of a good cause. Another thing, if you need new areas, is to maybe aprroach some church camps. YOu may ask if there are camps in your state or others near you and tell them what you are doing. You could ask if you could do a demo in front of the whole camp. MOst camps take offerings for causes of different types. Although it will be young people, they will ussually give generously in such a setting. This can also create new contacts in your area and surrounding areas. Some ministers may take the word back to their churches and decide to give out of pure donation without requesting demos or anything. Just an idea....... 



Date: 07/19/00 02:35:29 PM
Name: Stephen Lawwell

Email: slawwell@comdata.com

Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Fundraiser ideas

Article:
That is a good idea but we have pretty much saturated the area. We have performed for virtually every camp, youth ministry, and church (at least those that are of like faith) in our area. We have thought about doing some more extensive traveling to raise funds but the cost involved in taking even a small demo team would usually exceed the amount we would raise. Most of our demos outside of the area are seen as little "mission trips" for us, not fundraisers. We have had a few churches just give us an outright donation but there are very few.

Keep the ideas com'n!

Thanks,
Stephen 



Date: 07/19/00 05:07:43 PM
Name: Wes and Terrie

Email:

Subject: Re: Re: Re: Fundraiser ideas

Article:
On the 10k runs here,they are for the public, with the entry
fees going to your benefit,,but, we're sure either way would
work! Our daughter,and Wes have both participated in various runs
and "sleep-ins", and both are usaully very successful...Hope
it works out for you!.....

Wes&Terrie 



Date: 07/25/00 11:50:49 PM
Name: Sovann

Email: pens@juno.com

Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Fundraiser ideas

Article:
Stephen,

Try contacting the National Right to Life. And Pregancy Resource Centers (formerly Chrisis Pregnancy Centers). They not only might be willing to network you with folks who are passionate and willing to contribute to this project they may connect you with young women who are in need of it as well.

Grace to you,
Sovann



Date: 07/26/00 12:00:50 AM
Name: Sovann

Email: pens@juno.com

Subject: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Fundraiser ideas

Article:
Stephen,

You're ranked in Gracie Jiu Jitsu aren't you?
Do some intro to grappling seminars at stand-up schools (your old TKD school, maybe?). Show them the sport rules, basic positions and submissions.
Out here on the west coast privates and seminars for GJJ cost and arm and a leg.
If not grappling seminar, connect with other Christian instructors (or non-Christian for that matter if you know them).. Ask them to donate half a day or a day for a "Day in the Arts" gathering for Cross-training. You could even have some real "Cross Training" in God's Word. Have a meal together. Prayer and worship time. Grappling tourney or forms or standup for those so inclined at the end of the seminars.
Have a time to present the need and ask folks to give beyond what they paid for the day's instruction. I know I'd pay to do that.

God bless. God can do a mighty work in you.
-Sovann